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The Benefits of Adopting Digital Learning

If your business hasn’t entered the rapidly-growing world of digital learning yet, there are plenty of reasons why it should. At CDSM, we are passionate about delivering high quality e-learning and digital solutions that improve performance and enable businesses to stay ahead of the competition. In this blog post, we’ll be looking at how you can harness the power of digital learning to build on your success.

Learning is key not only to economic success, but to achieving our full potential as human beings. There’s no denying it: learning matters. Moreover, digital learning is the way to go. The US Department of Education reviewed previous research into the effectiveness of online learning, with two key findings:

  • Learners in online study conditions performed slightly better than those receiving face-to-face instruction
  • Learners in blended learning conditions performed much better than those receiving face-to-face instruction

We summarised the other important points to come out of the study in an infographic: e-Learning Paints a Pretty Picture. Most notably, it found that giving learners control over their learning has a positive impact. Enabling learners to self-monitor their understanding, giving them additional learning time, and putting them in control of their own interactions with media, all led to greater success.

businesswoman using computer - digital learning

If you’re still tentative about taking the leap, you should also consider the extent to which digital learning plays a key part in business productivity, and how this trend is set to continue in the future. We’ve previously highlighted the cost savings, and according to a Brandon Hall study (1995), digital learning in contrast to traditional classroom instruction:

  • Is quicker to deliver than traditional, classroom-based instruction
  • Increases learner retention
  • Boosts productivity
  • Improves the ability to introduce new products and services
  • Is quicker to update
  • Decreases skills gaps

According to a recent report – Modernising Learning: Delivering Results – over 90% of L&D leaders would like learning technology to enable a quicker response to changing business conditions and organisational change. In spite of all this, a massive 60% of organisations cannot implement a technology-enabled learning strategy due to lack of skills.

How Can CDSM Help?

With award-winning e-learning and digital learning solutions at the heart of what we do, CDSM can provide you with the tools you need for a more productive business, a more knowledgeable and skilled workforce, and a more positive working environment. The proof is in the performance.

There’s never been a better time to go digital.

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Sources:

Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies, U.S. Department of Education Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development Policy and Program Studies Service, Revised 2010

Modernising Learning: Delivering Results, Towards Maturity, November 2014

Return-on-Investment and Multimedia Training: a Research Study. Sunnyvale, CA:, Multimedia Training Newsletter, Brandon Hall, 1995a

Multimedia Training’s Return on Investment,Workforce Training News, Brandon Hall, 1995b, July/August

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Business E-learning Guides Insights

International E-Learning Part 2: How to Overcome the Challenges of Rolling Out E-Learning Across Different Countries

When rolling out a new e-learning programme across multiple countries, you will undoubtedly need to overcome a variety of different challenges. At CDSM, we have experienced these challenges first-hand, and have decided to relay our experiences in a three-part blog series on ‘International E-Learning’. In Part 1, we looked at 5 challenges that can impact on the success of an e-learning rollout. In this second part, we’ll look at how to overcome these challenges to achieve an easy and successful rollout across multiple countries.

International E-Learning Part 2

As explained in Part 1, performing an international rollout of an e-learning programme is a massive feat, with large scale co-ordination and organisation required. With 10,000 learners, spread over four-million square miles, our rollout of e-learning across all European Honda dealerships is a fantastic example of how to strike a balance between concept and budget. Our experience with this type of rollout has enabled us to develop innovative solutions to the challenges detailed in Part 1, and we want to share them with you.

Piloting to Success

We found that piloting is a really useful exercise, as it enabled us to engage with end users in different cultures and understand their preferences. We received first-hand feedback from the people who were actually using our content. Not only was this of great benefit to us, but it also made the users feel involved in the development of the programme, helping to increase the uptake and buy-in as the e-learning was rolled out.

However, with budget constraints in mind, it’s not possible to pilot everywhere. With Honda, we found that using their in-country representatives (i.e. Honda Area Managers) to devolve some of the piloting across their region made the localisation process easier without having an exorbitant cost.

Many Different Languages

We previously explored the importance of consistency in production in our blog post: ‘Why Developing Standards is Critical’. This focus on standards was a key foundation block for our work with Honda, and allowed us to ensure a consistency in translation across countries.

We worked with reps from different Honda regions to aid the creation of the company’s Pan-European Specification of Standards. This gave us and Honda’s L&D professionals a universal database, helping to decrease lengthy back-and-forth discussions over terminology, processes, etc.

Our partnership with SDL enabled a smooth translation process, avoiding the possibility of the procedure becoming a bottleneck in the project (in Part 3, we’ll look at how we achieved this in more detail).

Future-Proofing Technology

The consideration of what technology to use is a major evaluation point in the production of e-learning. With Honda, we overcame the problems of different user setups (e.g. different browsers, internet speeds, etc.) by creating a custom user interface, adopting cloud-based media file delivery, and enabling cross-browser support. To learn more, take a look at our white paper for the Honda project: ‘How to Produce Gold Award-Winning E-Learning’.

We also invested a lot of time in future-proofing. Several years ago, in response to the increasing impact of mobile devices in learning, we made the decision to move to using HTML5 and JavaScript as our core technology for presenting interactive content. Although we were under no pressure to render Adobe Flash Player obsolete within Honda’s e-learning programme, our commitment to HTML5 and JavaScript meant we avoided a logistical headache when the recent Flash vulnerabilities came to light.

Lighter Push Load

A key part of making the administration load lighter for Honda was the creation of engaging, contemporary e-learning. This meant that minimal pushing was required on the part of the customer.

When performing an international e-learning rollout, the last thing you want is your admin team spending all their time nagging people to complete it. Creating e-learning that engages the end user means that administration time can be better spent synchronising product releases and further training with what’s happening in the business.

It’s also important to make tracking and reporting as easy as possible, and with an LRS (Learner Record Store) in place you’ll get full coverage of everything including what works and what doesn’t without having any impediment on your LMS.

These are just a few of the ways we managed to overcome the challenges of rolling out a new e-learning programme across multiple countries. In Part 3, we’ll share the clever production technique we used to ensure the successful rollout of Honda’s BER course.

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E-learning Guides L&D

International E-Learning Part 1: 5 Challenges When Rolling Out E-Learning Across Different Countries

When rolling out a new e-learning programme across multiple countries, you will undoubtedly need to overcome a variety of different challenges. At CDSM, we have experienced these challenges first-hand, and have decided to relay our experiences in a three-part blog series on ‘International E-Learning’. In this first part, we’re going to look at the 5 challenges we think you need to consider, and how they can impact on the success of the rollout.

International E-Learning

  1.       Production Preferences

How do you actually produce content that’s going to work across different countries? Each country is different, and the people you deal with from each country will have a variety of specific likes and dislikes – so how far do you let them pick and choose what they want?

Before you begin working on an international e-learning rollout, you need to decide how accommodating you are prepared (and able) to be. You don’t want to be in a position where you’re creating bespoke content for each individual country, as this will not be practical or cost effective.

However, that’s not to say you don’t want to consider a country’s preferences and cultural differences, but it’s about finding a balance that won’t put pressure on production.   

  1.       Cultural Differences

You need to distinguish between objections that arise from personal preferences, and objections that are linked to cultural differences. Vague objections such as “it’s not like that in our market” will need to be explored to gain a better understanding of what is appropriate.

Again, decisions will need to be made about how accommodating you can be. For example, some countries will be adamant that their end users prefer video in their own language, rather than subtitles, but this could mean that production costs spiral out of control.

Demonstrating the benefits of a one-size-fits-all approach will help to ease tension – with an emphasis placed on the way that a centralised process ensures consistent, high-quality content. But remember, failing to recognise the importance of differences in culture between countries may mean that your end users feel disengaged, so make sure that every country-specific objection is carefully considered.

  1.       Translation

Translation can be a major challenge. For example, German text is typically 35% longer than English text, which can pose a problem if your content needs to fit in a set amount of space. So creating a consistent production process for translating e-learning into different languages is crucial.

Ultimately, all translations will be proofed by the country of origin, and then these checks themselves will need to be evaluated – are they asking for terminology changes or preferential changes? The more leeway that’s given, the more processes there are to undertake.

We previously explored the importance of consistency in production in our blog post: ‘Why Developing Standards is Critical’.

  1.       Technologies

Rolling out e-learning to multiple countries means catering for a diverse user base, not just in terms of language and culture, but technology too. How do you ensure that you are catering for users accessing the e-learning in different geographical locations with different setups? (e.g. different browsers, internet speeds, etc.)

For example, if the e-learning has sizeable media content, this will cause problems for users with low bandwidths. There may be an opportunity to create a ‘no-frills’ version of the e-learning for this type of user, with text summaries of video content and animations. Sizeable media content could then be placed in a separate repository within the UI for them to view if they wish.

However, creating branched versions for different user types can drive up costs, and so it may be more effective to perform an evaluation of potential content prior to production, making decisions about what content is absolutely necessary for the end user.

  1.       Administration

Rolling out a new e-learning programme across multiple countries will require a substantial amount of administration. This could range from setting up the e-learning on the LMS, to tracking and reporting the progress of end users.

Administration may also extend to promoting the completion of the programme, and synchronising the learning with other training.

This amount of administration will undoubtedly be time-consuming should you decide to take it on yourself. And if your e-learning is a compliance box-tick, then you may not have time to remedy any problems experienced by users, or gain a deeper understanding of the actual effectiveness of the e-learning.

These are the five main challenges you will come up against when rolling out a new e-learning programme across multiple countries. They may make an international rollout seem daunting, but don’t feel apprehensive…in Part 2, we’ll explore how to overcome these challenges to achieve an easy and successful roll out across multiple countries.

Got to International E-Learning Part 2 >

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CDSM E-learning Insights Instructional Design

So, you want to be an Instructional Designer?

Our Senior Instructional Designer, Rhys Williams, gives us an insight into how someone becomes an instructional designer, and explains what the varied role entails…

There’s a scene in the television sitcom Friends where Rachel and Monica are desperately trying to remember what Chandler – one of their best pals  – does for a living. It’s the final question in a high-stakes trivia game and if the girls can’t remember, they lose their apartment. Pressured into coming up with an answer, Rachel shouts out: “He’s a transpons…transponster!” Of course, she’s wrong – there’s no such thing as a transponster – and Chandler (an IT procurement manager) and Joey win the game and the bigger apartment.

You’re probably wondering – what does this have to do with instructional design? Well, I’ll tell you.  Outside of the e-learning industry, it seems that very few people know what an instructional designer is. Although my own group of friends (we don’t have our own television show, you’ll be saddened to hear) could all tell you, if asked, that I work in e-learning, or that my employers are CDSM Interactive Solutions, I’d bet that very few would be able to offer up ‘instructional designer’ as my job title. Some might even end up saying that I’m a transponster.  

Drawing design using pencils and ipad - Instructional Designer

It’s not their fault. Even though its origins stretch as far back as the 1940s, ‘instructional design’ isn’t a phrase you hear too often when you work outside the world of e-learning. Apparently, it’s not even that well known by those who work in it. The Internet is awash with blog posts about accidental instructional designers – writers, teachers and/or trainers by trade who suddenly realise that their work turning traditional teaching or training resources into digital learning material has a name and that name is ‘instructional design’. It’s a nice story (albeit one that’s quickly getting old), but it’s not my experience.

Back in 2011, CDSM advertised that they wanted a new instructional designer and I successfully applied, acknowledging that I had many of the essential skills listed in the job description:

  • A strong background in creative and technical writing
  • An existing knowledge of contemporary design
  • Experience in proofreading and editing (with excellent attention to detail)
  • A practical knowledge of the correct use of spelling, grammar, syntax, etc.
  • Good communication and organisational skills
  • A willingness to learn

As with any role, there are always certain skills that you’ll need to learn ‘on-the-job’, and so in the years that have followed I’ve had to add an extensive knowledge of contemporary technology and learning theory to my skill set – additions that have come from a mix of mentoring, reading and assimilation. But what exactly, you might be asking, am I using these skills for?

What Does an Instructional Designer Do?

Lady smiling at the computer - Instructional Design 2

Ultimately, an instructional designer’s main objective is to create engaging and effective learning experiences. You could call this our ‘bread and butter’. However, the role is actually a lot more varied than you might imagine. Despite some of the online horror stories about instructional design jobs, CDSM don’t chain me to my desk until I’ve turned a customer’s 495-page training manual into an hour-long e-learning module. For example, in the past few months I have:

  • Held meetings with customers to discuss requirements and scope
  • Worked closely with our developers and other designers to come up with new digital solutions
  • Written and directed a series of situation-based e-learning videos at an off-site location
  • Met with a teacher on secondment to Welsh Government to discuss the creation of new learning materials for Welsh schools
  • Attended a series of seminars on accessibility
  • Researched and co-written a six-part blog series on e-learning design

My regular desk-based work is just as diverse. One week I might be working on assessment questions for a blue-chip company’s international compliance course, and the next I’m creating new PISA resources for schools across Wales. It certainly keeps me on my toes!

What Do Instructional Designers Need to Know?

For an instructional designer, theory is everything. It’s easy for poor instruction to hide behind good design initially but, just like the Emperor and his new clothes, eventually everything’s going to become embarrassingly clear. It makes sense, if you think about it, because how can you create good e-learning if you don’t first understand how we learn?

Before taking up the role at CDSM, I had no formal training in teaching practice, but thanks to a programme of mentoring, training and on-the-job experience, I was soon able to begin creating engaging digital learning solutions.

Two men talking over what's on a computer - Instructional Design 3

Extensive reference materials and an informed reading list (containing books and articles on topics such as Skinner’s rats, Bloom’s taxonomy and Vygotsky’s disagreement with Piaget) were essential aspects of my training at CDSM, allowing me to become well-versed in learning theory. However, an instructional designer has to always be open to new ideas and research. Six months after I had first read about Bloom’s taxonomy, Shelly Wright of the Buck Institute for Education (BIE) published an article on ‘flipping it’. This is the type of fresh impetus that it’s important to keep a look out for, as it can change the way you approach solutions for certain types of learners.

It’s also important to know the possibilities and limitations of your technology, as what you create in storyboard format has to translate well to the screen. I’m lucky at CDSM because I’m able to work with a team of excellent developers and designers, all of whom are sympathetic and responsive to issues such as accessibility, usability and readability. This makes the e-learning we produce a truly collaborative effort, with the written, visual and technological aspects working in harmony so the learner can efficiently and effectively acquire the knowledge and/or skills they need.

So, if you still want to be an instructional designer, brushing up on your learning theory is an essential first step (you could even use our series on e-learning design as a starting point). Then once you begin working with a company, you can familiarise yourself with their technology – as well as the requirements and scope of their customers – and you’ll be away.

And it might also be an idea to prepare a response to the question “What’s that, then?”, for when you tell your friends your new job title.

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CDSM E-learning Insights Learning Pedagogy Software

E-Learning Design Part 6: CDSM’s Active Learning Model™

Throughout this series on e-learning design, we have looked at some of the learning theories that help to form the method and practice behind our award-winning e-learning. This is known as our ‘pedagogy’. In this final post in the series, we’re going to reveal how we ensure that sound theory is turned into exemplary practice, by giving you an insight into the formula we use for producing successful e-learning content for our customers – a formula we call our Active Learning Model™

What is CDSM’s Active Learning Model™?

CDSM’s Active Learning Model™

CDSM is a commercial e-learning company. This means that we are one of a number of national brands that claim expertise and excellence in designing and developing e-learning courses. So it’s important for us to distinguish our skills, expertise and service from other providers in the marketplace. One of the ways we do this is through the use of CDSM’s Active Learning Model™ – our formula for producing successful e-learning content derived from many years of professional teaching and learning experience.

At CDSM, we draw from a wide range of classical learning and contemporary memory theories – as varied as behaviourism, constructivism and social constructivism. With fundamentally differing views on how people learn, no one would blame you for assuming that these theories are mutually exclusive. However, in order to achieve the best-fit pedagogic approach, we carefully select the bits that work and can be practically applied for the relevant context, always using the best strategies to help people embed and recall knowledge or skills. We also consider learning styles and how we can cater for different learners, constructing an experience that will interest and challenge each and every user.

CDSM E-Learning Award Winners

How CDSM’s Active Learning Model™ Works for Everyone

Making sure that e-learning suits the circumstances of the end user it is intended for is very important if an e-learning course is to be a success. That’s why our Active Learning Model™ subscribes to leading thought on user experience, accessibility and usability, and why we spurn off-the-shelf products in favour of bespoke solutions that exactly fit our customers’ needs.  

Let’s take Bloom’s taxonomy as an example of a theory we utilise differently depending on circumstances. Learners working entirely independently may benefit from structured outcomes using Bloom’s taxonomy (i.e. outcomes that indicate precisely what is expected of them). In instances where this is the case, we may focus on outcomes that ensure that learners are able to understand and retain knowledge. However, for learners who benefit from having the scaffolding provided by a teacher, trainer or a community of peers, we may advise flipping Bloom’s, loosening the outcomes and offering a solution that enables learners to discover, create and share knowledge.

In order to ensure that our Active Learning Model™ achieves the results required, we give careful consideration to the nature and frequency of activities and assessments, choosing effective formative activities that help learners to check their own progress as they work their way through a unit of study. We also employ summative assessments at the end of a section or unit of study that others can use to assess learners’ achievements.

CDSM’s Active Learning Model™

The Future of CDSM’s Active Learning Model™

Our Active Learning Model™ has been expertly constructed, but it is not something that we consider to be sealed shut. It is a model that is interested and open to new ideas, research and fresh impetus from learning professionals from all over the world. Whatever solution we agree on, rest assured that we’ve considered the options and will deliver e-learning that not only engages your learners, but that responds to everyone’s needs based on our extensive knowledge and experience.

If you’ve enjoyed this series on e-learning design, or if you want to open a discussion about any of the points raised, then please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via our website, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook or Google+. We’d love to hear from you. And to make sure you don’t miss out on further news, blog posts and insights from CDSM, follow us and subscribe.

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CDSM E-learning News

Honda’s Compliance Course Set for Success

Honda E-Learning Course Results

Thanks to their partnership with CDSM, Honda Motor Europe are well on their way to achieving their legal compliance targets with their Core Curriculum Minimum e-learning programme.

As part of the EU Block Exemption Regulation ruling, it is essential that this e-learning programme is completed across all Honda dealerships in Europe by a specific date. However, this didn’t mean that the course had to fall into the common traps of standard compliance learning, which can and often be dull and disengaging for the learner.

CDSM’s rollout of Honda’s Core Curriculum Minimum programme has enjoyed first-rate feedback from end users across Europe, many of whom noted its appealing and engaging nature.

“The information is nice and succinct. No fluff.”

– Andrew Williams, Sales Advisor

“Nice design, photos, background – good use of imagery.”

 Annie Last, Sales Manager

“The format and layout made it easier to stay focused.”

 Darren Hall, Sales Advisor

The course is currently smashing the target pass rate of 25% per country (as of the end of June 2015). With an average pass rate of nearly 62%, and with some countries even hitting the 90–100% mark, it’s clear that Honda have a successful e-learning rollout on their hands.Not only has a significant improvement on previous Honda e-learning been highlighted, but due to the course being so user-friendly and intuitive, Honda’s support helpdesk are finding things much easier to manage too.

It’s been a long journey for Honda and CDSM, but we’re now seeing all our hard work pay off. And with new e-learning courses being developed and rolled out across the European dealerships, we’re excited to see what else we can achieve together.

If you would like to find out more about the Core Curriculum Minimum project, you can download our Honda Case Study.

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CDSM E-learning Insights Learning Pedagogy

E-Learning Design Part 1: Structure, Repetition and Reinforcement

In the competitive market of digital learning solutions, it’s easy for providers to fall into the trap of ignoring the sound theories of the past and only give their users a taste of the flavour of the month. Here at CDSM, however, we draw on a range of theories – from the past and the present – to form the method and practice behind our e-learning. In the coming weeks, we’ll be publishing a series of posts looking at the various learning theories that make up our ‘pedagogy’. First up: Behaviourism.

What is Behaviourism?

Have you ever heard of Pavlov’s Dogs, Skinner’s Rats or Thorndike’s Cats? All of these theorists focused on how animals learned to behave in certain ways as a result of changes to their environments.

Behaviourism

Emerging in the early part of the 20th century, behaviourism quickly became the main theory relating to how learning takes place. The theory is largely based on the results of experiments in which animals (including humans) learnt to display new behaviour patterns encouraged by repetition, reward and/or punishment.

For behaviourists, repetition is very important. John Watson, the father of behaviourism, suggested that the “more frequent a stimulus and response occur in association with each other, the stronger the habit will become.”

So how do reward and punishment reinforce behaviour, and motivate people to learn? Think back to when you were in school and the teacher set you homework. Your motivation to complete this work was probably influenced by at least one of the following:

  • To achieve a good mark or praise from the teacher
  • To avoid being shouted at by the teacher
  • To avoid receiving detention
  • To avoid having privileges taken away

These are all examples of reinforcement and punishment.

How Behaviourism Informs CDSM’s Pedagogy

Punishment is less helpful when it comes to adult learning – although it is still possible to use it effectively, you must be careful not to make your learner feel frustrated or undermined. However, reinforcement – in the form of positive feedback – can be just as rewarding for adult learners as it is for children. In our e-learning, we use reinforcement in the form of frequent feedback and praise:

Learning Assessment

Behaviourists place an emphasis on structured learning with observable and measurable outcomes, and this is something which is particularly important for users who complete e-learning in insolation. At CDSM, we add ‘signposts’ at regular intervals to help our users to find their way. These signposts take the form of learning outcomes, easily-accessible menus and section introductions. We also structure content into small, bite-sized chunks to help with this. Repetition then comes in the form of regular activities and summaries, reinforcing what the user has covered so far.

Learning Outcomes

Almost a century after it first emerged, the theory of behaviourism may seem a little ‘old school’ by today’s standards. At CDSM, we don’t believe that our users are simply empty vessels, ready to be filled to the brim with knowledge (as behaviourists do). But we also recognise that it’s important not to throw out the baby with the bathwater – which is why you’ll find some of the essential aspects of behaviourism in our pedagogy.

In Part 2 of this series, we’ll take a closer look at the behaviourist approach of having observable and measurable outcomes for learning, and explain why we ask our learners to ‘identify’, ‘summarise’ or ‘recognise’, rather than to simply ‘understand’.

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Business CDSM E-learning Insights L&D

Why Developing Standards is Critical

If you haven’t developed standards for your e-learning yet, then you should be doing it now!

Developing standards is criticalHaving standards means you have an agreed way of doing things, which helps to streamline processes. This could be a set of guidelines, or a code of practice captured to ensure the excellent performance of your product or service.

Not having a set of standards in place affects relationships with your people, your customers and your suppliers, and can also affect your revenue. Our experience with Honda proved just how important it is to develop standards.

The Challenge at Honda

Honda has been driving standards across all its European dealerships, so no matter whether a customer uses a dealership in Warsaw or Edinburgh, they receive the same high quality Honda experience. A recent EU ruling – ‘Block Exemption Regulation’, which allows new car owners to have their vehicles serviced at other manufacturer’s dealerships without affecting their warranty – meant that raising existing standards became critical for Honda to maintain a competitive advantage.

Honda already had the same look and feel in all their dealerships – from the lighting to the displays to the floors – but what about customer service? They knew that providing a consistent customer service would have a dramatic effect – so why didn’t they provide it?

Ensuring consistency in the look and feel of a dealership is one thing, but how do you ensure consistency in the training and behaviour of all your staff across 14 different languages?

The challenge was that several departments were handling different sections of training –each one using a different supplier in a different location, with different authoring tools, different templates, different navigation, and also different pedagogy.

The risks associated with inconsistent strategies for learning

  • Inconsistent standards of training across different staff roles
  • Varying quality of content, creating disengagement in some areas
  • Diverse look and feel across modules, steepening the learning curve
  • Disproportionate costs acquired across departments
  • Inconsistency for the learner, creating confusion and poor learning outcomes

Open notepad with concept of right and wrong strategy  on white
Consistency takes away the barriers to learning

Creating a universal standard of effective training for Honda meant that their learners received the same look and feel and, importantly, the same pedagogic rules.

CDSM had the challenge of unifying departments, and creating consistent and effective e-learning, across different languages and different elements of system integration. We didn’t guess what learners were going to like though – we piloted and used tactics to make the audience more receptive. It meant we could effectively align their learning experience and deliver the same consistent experience for Honda staff that they provided for their dealership customers.

Using Standards to Avoid Guess Work

Standards allow a company to not only have consistency, but also create an expectation across the organisation.

They provide receptiveness from learners, promoting engagement, as well as aiding a consistent and predictable cost level across departments.

If a department hasn’t previously used e-learning, having standards in place will allow them to foresee a measureable and predictable outcome. The same applies when you ask a new supplier to come on board – if you have a set standard, the supplier can get up and running for you as quickly as possible.

So, develop your standards now, and reap the benefits for both your staff and customers, as well as protecting that all-important bottom line.

If you would like to find out more about this project, download the Honda Case Study.

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